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Introduction to the Army Standardized Physical Training Program

UNITED STATES ARMY PHYSICAL FITNESS SCHOOL

FORT BENNING, GEORGIA

INTRODUCTION TO THE ARMY STANDARDIZED PHYSICAL TRAINING PROGRAM

INTRODUCTION: Method of Instruction: CO/TE

Instructor to student ratio is 1:60

Time of instruction: 50 minutes

Media Used: PowerPoint Presentation

 

Motivator: Physical training (PT) involves safe training that challenges all soldiers while improving their physical fitness level to meet the Army standard. Soldiers entering the Army range widely in their levels of physical fitness. Thus, special considerations must be taken when designing PT programs. The regulation and doctrine that govern the conduct of PT are AR 350-1, Army Training and Education, TRADOC Regulation 350-6, Enlisted Initial entry Training (IET) policies and Administration and the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

NOTE: Inform the students of the following terminal learning objective requirements and show slide 1 (TLO).

 

 

Terminal Learning Objective
At the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

ACTION:
Score 150 points or higher on the end-of-cycle APFT with 50 points or more in each event.

CONDITION:
Given FM 21-20, Chapter 14.

STANDARD:
Score 150 points or higher on the end-of-cycle APFT with 50 points or more in each event IAW FM 21-20, Chapter 14.

Safety Requirements None

Risk Assessment LowLevel

Environmental Considerations None

Evaluation The TLO will be evaluated using the end-of-cycle APFT.

Instructional Improving soldiers' physical fitness is one of the best ways to increase overall

Lead-in physical performance while controlling injuries. In this lesson you will build on your existing knowledge and learn parameters to teach, lead and assess soldiers in a standardized PT program.

 

PRESENTATION

A. ENABLING LEARNING OBJECTIVE (ELO) A

NOTE: Inform the students of the ELO requirements and show slide 2 (ELO A).

ACTION: Define physical fitness.

CONDITIONS: Given the TRADOC Standardized Physical Training Guide (BCT).

STANDARDS: Define physical fitness IAW the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

1. Learning Step/Activity 1 - The students will learn the definition of physical fitness IAW the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

Method of instruction: Lecture

Instructor to student ratio is 1:60

Time of instruction: 5 minutes

Media: PowerPoint Presentation

NOTE: Ask students how they would define physical fitness. Discuss their definitions, then show slide 3 (Definition of Army Physical Fitness).

a. Physical fitness is defined in The TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT) as the ability to effectively function in work, training and other activities while maintaining optimal health and well-being. Standardized PT contains three interrelated components: strength, endurance and mobility.

B. ELO B

NOTE: Inform the students of the ELO requirements and show slide 4 (ELO B).

ACTION Describe the components of Standardized PT.

CONDITIONS: Given the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

STANDARDS: Describe the components of Standardized PT IAW the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

1. Learning Step/Activity 1 - The students will learn the three components of Standardized PT as they relate

to the Army Standardized PT Program.

Method of instruction: Lecture

Instructor to student ratio is 1:60

Time of instruction: 10 minutes

Media: PowerPoint Presentation

NOTE: Show slide 5 and slide 6 (Components of Standardized PT).

a. The TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT) lists three components of Standardized PT.

NOTE: Show slide 7, slide 8 and slide 9 (Strength).

b. The TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT) defines strength as the ability to overcome resistance. Soldiers need strength to march under load, enter and clear a building or trench line, repeatedly load heavy rounds, lift equipment, and transport a wounded soldier to the casualty collection point. The goal of strength training is to attain the strength required to perform functional movements against resistance. A well-designed strength training program improves performance

and controls injuries. Calisthenics are the foundation of Army strength training and body management. The conditioning drills contain a structured sequence of calisthenics designed to develop the fundamental movement skills necessary for soldiers to manipulate their own body weight. Strength is further developed through the use of pull-ups, rope climbing, obstacle negotiation, free weights and strength training machines.

NOTE: Show slide 10, slide 11 and slide 12 (Endurance).

c. The TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT) defines endurance as the ability to sustain activity. Endurance training enhances both the ability to sustain high intensity activity of short duration (anaerobic) and low-intensity activity of long duration (aerobic). Examples of anaerobic training are sprinting, individual movement techniques, and negotiating obstacles. Examples of aerobic training are continuous running, foot marching, cross-country movement, and water survival. A properly planned and executed endurance-training program will be balanced with respect to both aerobic and anaerobic training. Endurance training programs based solely on distance running, while likely to improve aerobic endurance, may fail to prepare units for the anaerobic endurance requirements of soldier common tasks.

NOTE: Show slide 13, slide 14, slide 15 and slide 16 (Mobility).

d. The TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT) defines mobility as movement proficiency. The component of mobility functionally applies strength and endurance to enhance performance of physical tasks. For example, strength with mobility allows a soldier to squat low, in order to achieve a safe and effective position to lift a casualty. Without sufficient mobility, a strong soldier may have difficulty executing the same casualty transport technique. Likewise, endurance without mobility may be fine for a distance runner, but for soldiers performing individual movement techniques (IMT), both components are essential for success. Mobility consists of eight qualitative performance factors: agility, balance, coordination, posture, stability, flexibility speed and power.

NOTE: Show slide 17, slide 18, slide 19 and slide 20 (Qualitative Performance Factors of Mobility).

1. Agility is the ability to stop, start, change direction and efficiently change body position. Performing The Military Movement Drill, The Shuttle Run, and negotiating obstacles all improve agility.

2. Balance is the ability to maintain equilibrium. It is an essential component of movement. External forces, such as gravity and momentum, act on the body at any given time. Sensing these forces and responding appropriately leads to quality movements. The activities in this manual are designed to challenge and improve balance.

3. Coordination is the ability to perform multiple tasks. Driving military vehicles and operating various machinery and weaponry requires coordination. Coordination of arm, leg, and trunk movements is essential in climbing and IMT.

4. Posture is any position in which the body resides. Posture is fluid and constantly

changing as the body shifts to adapt to the forces of gravity and momentum. Good posture is important to military bearing and optimal body function. Proper carriage of the body during standing, sitting, lifting, marching, and running is essential to movement quality, performance, and injury control.

5. Stability is the ability to maintain or restore equilibrium when acted on by forces trying to

displace it. Stability is dependent upon structural strength and body management. It is developed through regular, precise performance of calisthenics and strength training activities.

6. Flexibility is pain-free range of motion at or around a joint; including the surrounding

muscle groups. Functional flexibility is dependent upon good posture and stability. Quality movements through a full range of motion, such as lifting a heavy load from the ground to an overhead position, require stability to ensure optimal performance without injury.

7. Speed is rate of movement. Many soldier tasks require speed. Speed is improved through better technique and conditioning. For example, running speed is improved by

lengthening stride (improving technique) and increasing pace (improving conditioning).

8. Power is the product of strength and speed. Throwing, jumping, striking, and moving

explosively from a starting position require both speed and strength. Power is generated

from the hips and torso. Developing strength, stability, and mobility is important to increasing power.

NOTE: Show slide 21 and slide 22 (Body Composition).

e. Body composition is the amount of body fat a soldier has in comparison to his lean body mass. Body composition is a component of health and well being, contributing to physical performance. Improving the components of strength, endurance and mobility through a sound physical training (PT) program, accompanied by good nutritional practices, will promote the maintenance of appropriate body composition. Refer to AR 600-9, The Army Weight Control Program, for specific information on diet, weight control and body composition guidelines.

C. ELO C

NOTE: Inform the students of the ELO requirements and show slide 23 (ELO C).

ACTION: Describe the principles of Standardized PT.

CONDITION: Given the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

STANDARDS: Describe the principles of Standardized PT IAW the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

1. Learning Step/Activity 1 - The students will learn the three principles of Standardized PT.

Method of instruction: Lecture

Instructor to student ratio is 1:60

Time of instruction: 10 minutes

Media: PowerPoint Presentation

NOTE: Show slide 24 (Principles of Standardized PT).

a. Adherence to certain basic exercise principles is essential to an effective and well-balanced

PT program that safely challenges all soldiers. There are three principles of Standardized PT (Precision, Progression and Integration) that must be followed to ensure safe training at an optimal level.

NOTE: Show slide 25 and slide 26 (Precision).

b. Precision is the strict adherence to optimal execution standards for PT activities. Precision is

based on the premise that the quality of movement is just as important as the weight lifted or repetitions performed. It is important not only for improving physical skills and abilities, but also for decreasing the likelihood of injury due to faulty movement. A precise execution standard in the conduct of all PT activities ensures the development of body management and fundamental movement skills.

NOTE: Show slide 27 and slide 28 (Progression).

c. Progression is the systematic increase in the intensity and/or duration of PT activities. Proper

progression allows the body to positively adapt to the stresses of training. When progression is violated by too rapid an increase in intensity and/or duration, the soldier is unable to adapt to the demands of training. The soldier is then unable to recover which leads to over-training or the possibility of injury.

NOTE: Show slide 29 and slide 30 (Integration).

d. Integration is the use of multiple training activities to achieve balance in the PT program and

appropriate recovery between PT activities. Because most common soldier tasks require a blend of strength, endurance and mobility, PT activity schedules are designed to challenge all three components in an integrated manner.

D. ELO D

NOTE: Inform the students of the ELO requirements and show slide 31 (ELO D).

ACTION: Describe the elements of an Army standardized PT session.

CONDITION: Given the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

STANDARD: Describe the elements of an Army standardized PT session IAW the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

1. Learning Step/Activity 1 - The students will learn the elements of an Army standardized PT

session.

Method of instruction: Lecture

Instructor to student ratio is 1:60

Time of instruction: 5 minutes

Media: PowerPoint Presentation

NOTE: Show slide 32 (Elements of an Army Standardized PT Session).

a. The Army standardized PT session will always include the elements of warm-up, activity and

cool-down.

NOTE: Show slide 33 (Warm-up).

b. The standardized PT session will always begin with warm-up followed by standardized PT

activities and cool-down. The warm-up should last approximately 10 to 15 minutes and occur just before the endurance and mobility or strength and mobility activities of the PT session. The performance of Conditioning Drill 1 (5 repetitions x 1 set) followed by Military Movement Drill 1 (1 repetition x 1 set) comprises the warm-up for ALL PT sessions. After the warm-up, soldiers are ready for more intense conditioning activities.

NOTE: Show slide 34 (Activities).

c. Perform only those activities listed in Chapter 5 of the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

NOTE: Show slide 35 and slide 36 (Cool-down).

d. The cool-down serves to gradually slow the heart rate and helps prevent pooling of the blood

in the legs and feet. Soldiers should begin the cool down by walking until their heart rates return to less than 100 beats per minute (BPM) and heavy sweating stops. The cool-down should last approximately 10 to 15 minutes and occur immediately after the endurance and mobility or strength and mobility activities of the Army standardized PT session. The performance of Conditioning Drill 1 (1 set x 5 repetitions) followed by The Stretch Drill (hold for 20 seconds) comprises the cool-down for ALL PT sessions. Cool-down safely brings soldiers back to their pre-exercise state after performing intense conditioning activities. Performance of the cool-down also helps to improve flexibility and range of motion.

E. ELO E

NOTE: Inform the students of the ELO requirements and show slide 37 (ELO E).

ACTION: Describe the Reconditioning Program as part of the Army Standardized PT

Program.

CONDITION: Given the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

STANDARD: Describe the Reconditioning Program IAW the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

1. Learning Step/Activity 1 - The students will learn the elements of an Army standardized PT

session.

Method of instruction: Lecture

Instructor to student ratio is 1:60

Time of instruction: 5 minutes

Media: PowerPoint Presentation

NOTE: Show slide 38 (Reconditioning Program).

a. The Reconditioning Program provides adequate recovery and rehabilitation for injured

soldiers before they re-enter the Army Standardized PT Program.

b. The Reconditioning Program is described in Chapter 10 of the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

F. ELO F

NOTE: Inform the students of the ELO requirements and show slide 39 (ELO F).

ACTION: Describe the Army standardized PT assessment and evaluation.

CONDITION: Given the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

STANDARD: Describe the elements of an Army standardized PT session IAW the TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT).

1. Learning Step/Activity 1 - The students will learn the Army standardized PT assessment and

evaluation.

Method of instruction: Lecture

Instructor to student ratio is 1:60

Time of instruction: 5 minutes

Media: PowerPoint Presentation

NOTE: Show slide 40 (Assessment and Evaluation).

a. The Army standard for assessing physical fitness is the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT).

The commander may use a number of assessment tools appropriate to determining his unit's readiness based on mission and METL. The APFT is one of these tools. The APFT measures baseline physical fitness, qualifying soldiers to wear the uniform. There may be additional physical requirements to meet the unit mission. IAW AR 350-1, Training in Units, The APFT must be performed at least two times per year for active units and once per year for reserve component soldiers. Refer to Chapter 8 of this guide for procedures to conduct of the APFT.

NOTE: Show slide 41 (Assessment and Evaluation).

b. The 1-1-1 Physical Fitness Assessment, described in Chapter 9 of this guide, is a quick and

easy snapshot for the commander of unit APFT readiness and is used to determine a soldiers' appropriate placement in running ability groups.

SUMMARY: Method of Instruction: Lecture/Discussion

Instructor to Student Ratio: 1:60

Time of Instruction: 5 minutes

NOTE: Show slide 42 through slide 48 (TLO and ELO A through ELO F).

Review/ NOTE: Review the action statement on ELO slides and summarize each one, then Summarize review the TLO viewgraph and explain how the ELOs relate to the TLO.

NOTE: Determine if students have learned the material presented by soliciting student questions and explanations. Ask the students questions and correct misunderstandings.

Check on QUESTIONS

Learning

NOTE: Show slide 49 and slide 50 (QUESTIONS).

Q. What is the definition of physical fitness?

A. Physical fitness is defined in The TRADOC Standardized PT Guide (BCT) as the ability to effectively function in work, training and other activities while maintaining optimal health and well-being. Standardized PT contains three interrelated components: strength, endurance and mobility.

NOTE: Show slide 51 and slide 52 (QUESTIONS).

Q. What are the three components of Standardized PT?

A. Strength, Endurance and Mobility.

NOTE: Show slide 53 and slide 54 (QUESTIONS).

Q. What are the performance factors related to mobility?

A. Mobility consists of eight qualitative performance factors: agility, balance, coordination, posture, stability, flexibility speed and power.

NOTE: Show slide 55 and slide 56 (QUESTIONS).

Q. What are the three principles of Standardized PT?

A. Precision, Progression and Integration.

NOTE: Show slide 57 and slide 58 (QUESTIONS).

Q. What are the three elements of an Army standardized PT session?

A. Warm-up, Activity and Cool-down.

NOTE: Solicit and answer the students' questions. This is not a graded activity.

Transition The information taught in this period of instruction lays the foundation on which the

To Next remainder of the course will be built. If you understand how to apply the concepts

Lesson presented in this block of instruction, when coupled with the subsequent training you are going to receive, you will have the tools to successfully conduct safe and effective standardized PT programs.