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052-192-1042 (SL1) - Perform Self-Extraction from a Mined Area

Standards: Self-extract from a mined area, by foot or from a vehicle, under the following conditions without causing personal injury or mine detonation. When footprints are clearly visible, when footprints are not clearly visible (stepping-stone and lane technique), and from a vehicle. Locate, mark, and bypass each trip wire and mine within the area probed. Remove enough soil to confirm the presence of a mine. Report the mined area information to higher headquarters.

Conditions:
You are in an area containing buried mines
and trip wire-activated mines, given a
probing device, a trip wire feeler, personal
protective equipment, marking material, and
a vehicle.

Note:
A mine detector is not available.

Standards:
Self-extract from a mined area, by foot or
from a vehicle, under the following
conditions without causing personal injury
or mine detonation. When footprints are
clearly visible, when footprints are not
clearly visible (stepping-stone and lane
technique), and from a vehicle. Locate,
mark, and bypass each trip wire and mine
within the area probed. Remove enough soil
to confirm the presence of a mine. Report
the mined area information to higher
headquarters.

 

Performance
Steps

1.  
Take immediate action on
observed indicators or confirmation of
a mine.

Note:
The acronym for stop, assess, note,
draw back, inform (SANDI) is used to
remember the sequence of events for
extraction. Stop and gain
control of yourself. Assess the
situation of mines or booby traps and
personnel. Note the situation
for future reference. Draw back
to the last known safe area.
Self-extraction to the nearest safe
area may be referred to as draw back. Inform
higher headquarters of the situation.
The letters from the acronym will be
reinforced throughout this task and
represented with bold letters.

a.
Stop immediately and
gain control of yourself.

(1) 
Do not move your feet if
you are on foot.

(2) 
Remain in the vehicle.

(3) 
Warn other elements
operating in the area, and advise
higher elements of the situation
for possible support with
extraction.

Note
In an emergency mine situation
involving a single casualty, call for
help. If the casualty is conscious,
establish communication with the
victim. Instruct the soldier to remain
still and administer self-help first
aid. Reassure him that help is coming.
The use of radio communications
equipment is acceptable. While there
are certain mines that can be fuzed to
detonate on a specific radio
frequency, these mines are extremely
rare and unlikely to be encountered
within a minefield. The life saving
advantage of using a radio to call for
help far outweighs the threat of radio
frequency-activated mines. Submit a
medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) report.

b.
Assess the situation.

(1) 
Determine the nearest safe
area not containing mines.

(2) 
Determine the shortest
route to the safe area.

(3) 
Determine if in the middle
of a mined area.

c.
Note the situation.

(1) 
Make notes about the mine
that you see.

(a)  
Describe the shape, and
draw pictures if necessary
(square, round, conical,
circular, rectangular, concave,
dome, or cylindrical) (Figure
052-192-1042-1).

 

 






Figure 052-192-1042-1. Samples of
Mine Shapes

 

 

(b)  
State the color (light
green, dark green, brown, black,
sand, camouflage, gray,
metallic, natural wood, olive,
blue, or white).

 

(c)  
Annotate the size.

 

(d)  
Annotate the material
type. Most mines are made of
plastic, plastic casting, wood,
sheet metal, cast iron, metal
alloys, concrete, Bakelite ™,
and cast explosive.

 

(2) 
Indicate the number of
mines.

 

(3) 
Annotate the terrain
considerations.

 

(4) 
Indicate the location.

 

Note
1
:
Stay where you are, if possible, when
support is available. If support is
delayed, consider probing a safe area
to sit.

Note 2: Go to
performance step 2 to perform
self-extraction when footprints are
not clearly visible (without a
vehicle) or to perform casualty
evacuation using the lane technique.
Go to performance step 2b to perform
the stepping-stone technique (no
casualties). Go to performance step 3
to perform self-extraction from a
vehicle. Go to performance step 4 to
perform self-extraction when
footprints are clearly visible
(without a vehicle). Go to performance
step 5 to perform actions after
detecting a trip wire. Go to
performance step 6 to perform actions
after detecting a possible mine while
probing.

Note 3: Consider
clearing an area to place excess
equipment, such as a ruck sack and
load bearing equipment, if it is going
to take a long time to reach a safe
area.

 

2.  
Perform self-extraction when
footprints are not clearly visible
(without a vehicle).

 

Note
1
: Carry a personal extraction
kit. For example, as a minimum, carry
50 markers, pins, or poker chips; a
trip wire feeler; and a probe
(nonmetallic preferred). Use of a
nonmetallic probe is recommended. When
a nonmetallic probe is not available,
probing tools can be made of any
material as long as they are rigid
enough to push through the soil, long
enough to penetrate the ground at
least 3 inches at a 30° angle, and
small enough so that a soldier can
continue the probing drill for several
hours. Magnetic and nonmagnetic metal
tools, such as bayonets, screwdrivers,
and penknives are suitable for probing
when a nonmetallic probe is not
available.

Note 2: The prone
position is the safest position to
probe from because it reduces the
casualty-causing effects of an
accidental blast. The lane technique
is normally performed for casualty
evacuation.

Note 3: Use the
stepping-stone technique when there
are no casualties. This technique
provides speed by minimizing the area
probed and cleared for extraction. A
probing soldier will not adopt the
prone position while performing this
technique. Go to performance step 2b
for the stepping-stone technique.

 

a.
Assume the prone position.

 

(1) 
Squat down without touching
your knees to the ground.

 

(2) 
Use the look-feel-probe
procedure to clear the area.

 

(a)  
Look around for
high and low trip wires. Look
for mine indicators on the
ground, to include mine fuzes,
mine parts, or disturbed ground.

 

(b)  
Feel for trip
wires using the trip wire
feeler. Push the trip wire
feeler forward along the ground
from your feet to your front
left, then front center, and
then front right. Raise the trip
wire feeler in a gentle upward
sweeping action to above your
head height.
Feel the ground around
your feet with your fingers
using a slow sideways sweep,
feeling for exposed mine fuze
prongs or other mine parts.

 

Note
1
:
A trip wire feeler can be made of a
light, wooden rod or stick; a
light-gauge wire; plastic rods; or
anything else that will allow you to
feel a trip wire without activating
it. The trip wire feeler must be a
minimum of 24-inches long and a
maximum of 36-inches long. The trip
wire feeler should be stiff enough to
be held straight out to the front, but
not so stiff as to come in contact
with a trip wire without you being
able to feel the wire.

Note 2: Go to
performance step 5 for performance
actions taken after detecting a trip
wire.

 

(c)  
Probe the area as
far forward as comfortable.
Hold the probe in either hand,
with the palm up, allowing the
blunt end of the probe to extend
beyond the cup of the palm.
Apply just enough pressure on
the probe to sink it slowly into
the ground at a 30° angle and
to a depth of 3 inches (Figure
052-192-1042-2).

 

 



Figure 052-192-1042-2. Probing
Technique Using a Suitable Probe

 

 

DANGER:


USE
EXTREME CAUTION WHEN PROBING. IF YOU
PROBE AT AN ANGLE OF MORE THAN 30°,
THE PROBE TIP MAY DETONATE A MINE
.

 

(d)  
Probe every 1 inch
across the required extraction
width path (0.6 meter [24
inches] for self extraction, 1
meter for evacuating a casualty
using the individual-carry
technique, and 2 meters for
evacuating a casualty using a
litter), then move forward 1
inch and stagger (offset) the
probe indentations from the
previously probed row (Figure
052-192-1042-3).

 

 




Figure 052-192-1042-3. Probing
Across the Required Extraction Width
Path

 

 

Note:
Continue the probing technique and
ensure that the probe indentations in
each row are offset from the
previously probed rows, thus creating
a diamond shape
.

 

(3) 
Kneel on the ground after
the area is found to be clear, and
continue probing forward until you
can assume the prone position.

 

(4) 
Continue the look-feel-probe
procedure across the required
extraction width path until you
reach a safe area or the casualty.

 

Note:
Go to performance step 6 for actions
taken after detecting a possible mine.

 

(a)  
Clear up to and under the
casualty in case he is lying on
a mine.

 

(b)  
Clear and mark a 1-meter
circumference around the
casualty for individual-carry
extraction or a 2-meter
circumference for litter-carry
extraction.

 

(c)  
Remove the casualty out
of the mined area.

 

(5) 
Mark the area for mines.

 

(6) 
Inform higher
headquarters with noted
information using the UXO spot
report (Figure 052-192-1042-4).

 

 

 

Line

 

1

Date-Time Group:

DTG
item was discovered.

2

Reporting Activity:

UIC and grid location.

3

Contact Method:

Radio frequency, call
sign, POC and telephone
number.

4

Type of Ordnance:

Dropped, projected,
placed, or thrown. If
available, supply the
subgroup. Give the number of
items, if more than one.

5

NBC Contamination:

Be as specific as
possible.

6

Resources
Threatened:

Report any equipment,
facilities, or other assets
that are threatened.

7

Impact on Mission:

Provide a short
description of your current
tactical situation and how the
presence of the UXO affects
your status.

8

Protective Measures:

Describe any measures
you have taken to protect
personnel and equipment.

9

Recommended
Priority
:

Recommend a priority
of response by EOD technicians
or engineers.



Figure 052-192-1042-4. UXO Spot
Report

 



    

 

b.
Use the stepping-stone
technique (Figure 052-192-1042-5).

 






Figure 052-192-1042-5. Stepping
Stone Technique

 

 

Note:
Go to performance step 5 for actions
taken after detecting a trip wire. Go
to performance step 6 for performance
actions taken after detecting a
possible mine.

 

(1) 
Clear individual
stepping-stone areas to step into
by using the look-feel-probe
procedure.

 

(2) 
Probe from a squatted
position an area of 18 inches in
diameter to your front to allow
for both feet to stand in the
area. The gap between
stepping-stones should be no more
than 12 inches.

 

(3) 
Step into the cleared area
and reorient towards the
previously determined safe area.

 

(4) 
Mark each stepping-stone
perimeter or center.

 

(5) 
Continue the
look-feel-probe procedure during
the stepping-stone technique until
a safe area is reached.

 

Note:
The
look-feel-probe procedure is
performed the same as previously
mentioned except the area probed is 18
inches in diameter.

 

(6) 
Mark the area for mines.

 

(7) 
Inform higher
headquarters with noted
information using the UXO spot
report.

 

3.  
Perform self-extraction from a
vehicle.

 

a.
Stop immediately.

 

b.
Radio
the situation to higher
headquarters, and remain in the
vehicle.

 

c.
Extract from the rear of the
vehicle after all communication
efforts have failed, and walk inside
the visible tire track to the last
known safe area.

 

CAUTION:
Tracked vehicle tracks may also be
followed, but care must be taken as
small antipersonnel mine fuzes have
been known to be missed by the gaps in
the track shoes. These mines pose a
threat to personnel walking inside the
vehicle track marks.

 

Note:
Go
to performance step 5 for actions
taken after detecting a trip wire. Go
to performance step 6 for performance
actions taken after detecting a
possible mine while probing
.

 

d.
Perform the look-feel-probe
procedure from the vehicle to the
last known safe area if the tracks
are not clearly visible.

 

e.
Probe
an area to step in from the vehicle
before making contact with the
ground.

 

f. 
Mark the area for mines.

 

g.
Inform higher
headquarters with noted information
using the UXO spot report.

 

4.  
Perform self-extraction when
footprints are clearly visible
(without a vehicle).

 

WARNING:
This self-extraction method is the
least preferred and should only be
performed when time is the determining
factor

 

a.
Turn around carefully within
your footprints, and follow the
exact footprints back along the path
entered.

 

b.
Follow the footprints until
clear of the threat.

 

c.
Mark the area for mines.

 

d.
Inform higher
headquarters with noted information
using the UXO spot report.

 

5.  
Perform the following actions
after detecting a trip wire:

 

Note:
When a trip wire is located, stand
still and visually inspect the wire
along its length to identify the
possible mine location and trip wire
anchor point.

 

WARNING:
Do not attempt to touch, move, or cut
any trip wires that are found

 

a.
Identify the shortest route
to probe around the trip wire.

 

b.
Probe the required extraction
width path (0.6 meter [24 inches]
for self extraction, 1 meter for
evacuating a casualty using the
individual-carry technique, and 2
meters for evacuating a casualty
using a litter), 12 inches away from
but along the line of the trip wire
until you safely bypass the hazard.

 

c.
Mark the line of the trip
wire along the ground surface 12
inches before the trip wire (Figure
052-192-1042-6).

 






Figure 052-192-1042-6. Marking a
Trip Wire

 

 



6.  
Perform the following actions
after detecting a possible mine while
probing:

 

a.
Stop probing when the probe
encounters a solid object.

 

b.
Investigate the solid object.

 

(1) 
Start excavation 6
inches back from the suspect
object.

 

(2) 
Dig towards the
suspected object using a suitable
tool or your fingers in a sideward
action.

 

Note:
Periodically use the probe to verify
the suspected mine location
.

 

(3) 
Stop excavation when you
encounter the solid object.

 

(a)  
Use two fingers from each
hand to carefully remove the
minimum amount of surrounding
soil to confirm the object as a
mine or not.

 

(b)  
Mark the location with a
marker 6 inches to the rear of
the mine if the object is
confirmed as a mine. Continue
moving forward if the object is
not a mine.

 

WARNING:
Do not attempt to remove or
disarm the mine. Report the
hazard to higher headquarters.

 

(c)  
Bypass the marked mine
and continue moving towards the
safe area.

c.
Mark either one or both sides
of the cleared path as you move
forward.

 

Evaluation
Preparation:
 
Provide the soldier with the items
and information listed in the conditions.
The soldier must perform the performance
substeps in sequence to self-extract from a
mined area. Performance steps 2 through 4 of
this task indicate different situations
while performing self-extraction.

 

Performance
Measures

GO

NO
GO

1.  
Took immediate action on
observed indicators or confirmation of
a mine.

a.
Stopped immediately and
gained control of himself.

 

 

(1) 
Did not move his feet
(no vehicle).

 

 

(2) 
Remained in the vehicle.

 

 

(3) 
Warned other elements
operating in the area, and advised
higher elements of the situation
for possible support with
extraction.

 

 

b.
Assessed the situation.

 

 

(1) 
Determined the nearest safe
area not containing mines.

 

 

(2) 
Determined the shortest
route to the safe area.

 

 

(3) 
Determined if in the middle
of a mined area.

 

 

c.
Noted the situation.

 

 

(1) 
Made notes about the mine.

 

 

(a)  
Described the shape, and
drew pictures if necessary
(square, round, conical,
circular, rectangular, concave,
dome, or cylindrical).

 

 

(b)  
Stated the color (light
green, dark green, brown, black,
sand, camouflage, gray,
metallic, natural wood, olive,
blue, or white).

 

 

(c)  
Annotated the size.

 

 

(d)  
Annotated the material
type. Most mines are made of
plastic, plastic casting, wood,
sheet metal, cast iron, metal
alloys, concrete, Bakelite ™,
and cast explosive.

 

 

(2) 
Indicated the number of
mines.

 

 

(3) 
Annotated the terrain
considerations.

 

 

(4) 
Indicated the location.

 

 

2.  
Performed self-extraction when
footprints were not clearly visible
(without a vehicle).

a.
Assumed the prone position.

 

 

(1) 
Squatted down without
touching his knees to the ground.

 

 

(2) 
Used the look-feel-probe
procedure to clear the area.

 

 

(a)  
Looked around for high
and low trip wires. Looked for
mine indicators on the ground,
to include mine fuzes, mine
parts, or disturbed ground.

 

 

(b)  
Felt for trip wires using
the trip wire feeler. Pushed the
trip wire feeler forward along
the ground from his feet to his
front left, then front center,
and then front right. Raised the
trip wire feeler in a gentle
upward sweeping action to above
head height.
Felt the ground around his feet
with his fingers using a slow
sideways sweep, feeling for
exposed mine fuze prongs or
other mine parts.

 

 

(c)  
Probed the area as far
forward as comfortable.
Held the probe in either hand,
with the palm up, allowing the
blunt end of the probe to extend
beyond the cup of the palm.
Applied just enough pressure on
the probe to sink it slowly into
the ground at a 30° angle and
to a depth of 3 inches.

  

 

(d)  
Probed every 1 inch
across the required extraction
width (0.6 meter [24 inches] for
self extraction, 1 meter for
evacuating a casualty using the
individual-carry technique, and
2 meters for evacuating a
casualty using a litter), then
moved forward 1 inch and
staggered (offset) the probe
indentations from the previously
probed row.

 

 

(3) 
Kneeled on the ground after
the area was found to be clear,
and continued probing forward
until he could assume the prone
position.

 

 

(4) 
Continued the
look-feel-probe procedure across
the required extraction width path
until he reached a safe area or
the casualty.

 

 

(a)  
Cleared up to and
under the casualty in case he
was lying on a mine.

 

 

(b)  
Cleared and marked a
1-meter circumference around the
casualty for individual-carry
extraction or a 2-meter
circumference for litter-carry
extraction.

 

 

(c)  
Removed the casualty out
of the mined area.

 

 

(5) 
Marked the area for mines.

 

 

(6) 
Informed higher
headquarters with noted
information using the UXO spot
report.

 

 

b.
Used the stepping-stone
technique.

 

 

(1) 
Cleared individual
stepping-stone areas to step into
by using the look-feel-probe
procedure.

 

 

(2) 
Probed from the squatted
position an area of 18 inches in
diameter to his front to allow for
both feet to stand in the area.
The gap between stepping-stones
was no more than 12 inches.

 

 

(3) 
Stepped into the cleared
area and reoriented towards the
determined safe area.

 

 

(4) 
Marked each stepping-stone
perimeter or center.

 

 

(5) 
Continued the
look-feel-probe procedure during
the stepping-stone technique until
a safe area was reached.

 

 

(6) 
Marked the area for
mines.

 

 

(7) 
Informed higher
headquarters with noted
information using the UXO spot
report.

 

 

3.  
Performed self-extraction
from a vehicle.

a.
Stopped immediately.

 

 

b.
Radioed
the situation to higher
headquarters, and remained in the
vehicle.

 

 

c.
Extracted from the rear of
the vehicle after all communication
efforts failed, and walked inside
the visible vehicle tire track to
the last known safe area.

 

 

d.
Performed
the look-feel-probe procedure from
the vehicle to the last known safe
area if the tracks were not clearly
visible.

 

 

e.
Probed an area to step in
from the vehicle before making
contact with the ground.

 

 

f. 
Marked the area for
mines.

 

 

g.
Informed
higher headquarters with noted
information using the UXO spot
report.

 

 

4.  
Performed self-extraction
when footprints were clearly visible
(without a vehicle).

a.
Turned around carefully
within his footprints, and followed
the exact footprints back along the
path entered.

 

 

b.
Followed the footprints until
clear of the threat.

 

 

c.
Marked
the area for mines.

 

 

d.
Informed higher headquarters
with noted information using the UXO
spot report.

 

 

5.  
Performed the following
actions after detecting a trip wire:

a.
Identified the shortest
route to probe around the trip wire.

 

 

b.
Probed
the required extraction width path
(0.6 meter [24 inches] for self
extraction, 1 meter for evacuating a
casualty using the individual-carry
technique, and 2 meters for
evacuating a casualty using a
litter), 12 inches away from but
along the line of the trip wire
until he safely bypassed the hazard.

 

 

c.
Marked
the line of the trip wire along the
ground surface 12 inches before the
trip wire.

 

 

6.  
Performed the following actions
after detecting a possible mine while
probing:

a.
Stopped probing when the
probe encountered a solid object.

 

 

b.
Investigated
the solid object.

 

 

(1) 
Started excavation 6
inches back from the suspected
object.

 

 

(2) 
Dug towards the suspected
object using a suitable tool or
his fingers in a sideward action.

 

 

(3) 
Stopped excavation when
he encountered the solid object.

 

 

(a)  
Used two fingers from
each hand to carefully remove
the minimum amount of
surrounding soil to confirm the
object as a mine or not.

 

 

(b)  
Marked the location
with a marker 6 inches to the
rear of the mine if the object
was a mine. Continued moving
forward if the object was not a
mine.

 

 

(c)  
Bypassed the marked
mine and continued moving
towards the safe area.

 

 

c.
Marked
either one or both sides of the
cleared path as he moved forward.

 

 

 

Evaluation
Guidance:
 
Score the soldier GO if all
performance measures are passed (P). Score
the soldier NO GO if any performance measure
is failed (F). If the soldier scores NO GO,
show the soldier what was done wrong and how
to do it correctly.

 

References

 

Required

Related

 

 

FM
20-32

 

 

GTA
05-10-044

 

 

TC
20-32-5


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