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Active Duty Information - U.S. Air Force

U.S. Air Force Active Duty Pregnancy Information
Posted : Monday, January 01, 1900

Congratulations!

Whether you are pregnant for the first time or are an experienced mother, and whether your pregnancy was expected or a bit of a surprise, we want your pregnancy to be healthy, happy and successful. Pregnancy for anyone, let alone women on active duty in the military, can be a challenging experience. The Air force has joined our sister services to create a plan of care, based on the best available current medical evidence, that will maximize your chances of a successful pregnancy. Our goal is to provide you with the care and education that you need to take home a healthy baby and be optimally prepared to care for your new addition. After all, your baby will be a new member to our Air Force family.

The plan of care and educational materials that are associated with these pregnancy guidelines as well as the requirements / limitations listed on your pregnancy profile will serve as a framework for your care during your pregnancy. There may be occasion to deviate from these guidelines due to your specific circumstances, potential pregnancy complications, local practices, and new medical information. Please remember that these are guidelines and are not a substitute for specific recommendations made by a qualified health care provider.

At your first visit with your obstetrical health care provider, you should receive a document (pregnancy profile) that outlines some requirements and limitations regarding your activity during your pregnancy. As an Air Force service member, it is your responsibility to notify your supervisor regarding your pregnancy soon after pregnancy is diagnosed, and make sure that your supervisor gets a copy of the profile as soon as you receive it (AFI 48-123).

The pregnancy profile limits requirements for physical training, body weight requirements and environmental exposures. During your pregnancy and for at least six weeks following delivery, you are not worldwide qualified and must be removed from mobility status. Some of the limitations on your activity and military requirements extend as far as six months beyond your delivery. Although you are not required to perform formal physical training or weigh-ins, we strongly encourage you to eat a healthy diet and perform moderate exercise during your pregnancy. Most facilities offer programs on appropriate exercise, healthy diet, tobacco cessation, labor and delivery, and new mom classes and other programs, specifically for pregnant women. We encourage you to take advantage of these programs as well as some of the many other activities and resources that are available to you during your pregnancy.

We suggest that you be cautious about information and advice that you receive from family members, friends and the internet or from other outside sources. While most of these sources are well-meaning and may provide important support, bad advice and inaccurate information is common. Please make sure to discuss your specific concerns with your health care provider.

When possible, we encourage you to involve your baby's father or other important support person in your care. You are most likely to have a good outcome if you have a close, cooperative and positive interaction between you, your partner and your health care provider. Once again, congratulations. We look forward to serving you.

Extracted from Pregnancy and Childbirth, A goal oriented guide to prenatal care. Version 2.1, February 2004. VA/DOD uncomplicated pregnancy clinical practice guideline - December 2002