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How Do I Transfer What Is Left of My Montgomery GI Bill to My Sons?

Author Ron Kness is no longer in the service.

Q: I am currently active duty with plans of coming off contract in February 2014. How can I transfer what will be left of my Montgomery GI Bill to my sons? Will I be able to do that? Please be as detailed and in depth as possible. Thank you for your time. Good day and God Bless.

A:  The procedure to transfer from the Montgomery GI Bill to the New GI Bill is simple, if you meet the eligibility requirements for the Post 9/11 GI Bill. I can’t tell from your question how many years you have in, but there are two service requirements that must be met before you can access the Post 9/11 GI Bill transfer of benefits option. First, you must have served for at least six years of which at least three years has to be after September 10, 2001.

Next, you have to agree to serve another four years unless you are within four years of being retirement eligible. If so, the four year requirement will be prorated down to a lesser amount.

Once the service requirements are in place, then you can enter into your son’s record from the transfer of benefits website the number of months you wish to transfer to him. Once finished, you will see the Status Block will read “Pending Status”. Keep coming back to the website periodically and look for the status to change to “Approved”. It can take 8 to 10 weeks for the change to happen.

Once approved, your son can submit VA Form 22-1990e from the eBenefits website. In return, he will get back a Certificate of Eligibility that he will need when enrolling in school.

Once enrolled in school, the VA will pay his tuition and fees directly to his school. He will get a monthly housing allowance and a book stipend. The book stipend is paid once each semester at the rate of $41.67 per credit. The housing stipend is based on the zip code of his school, paid at the pay grade of an E-5 with dependents, with the amount he will receive driven by the number of credits he is taking, verses what his school considers to be full-time.

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