This website is not affiliated with the U.S. government or military.

How Can I Request a One-Year GI Bill Extension?

Author Ron Kness is no longer in the service.

Q: Hi, Could I get advice on whether I could request a one year extension/or appeal if I signed up for the Post 9/11 GI Bill? When the Post 9/11 GI bill passed, the VA rep admitted that he was fairly new on all the details, but indicated that I would be receiving extra income for housing, so I bought off on it. The problem: I could not take it back once I found out that I would not be able to request a one year extension (had I not transferred to the new Post 9/11 GI Bill. I received a letter indicating that I exhausted my GI Bill benefits and had a year to appeal. Ugh … any advice?

A: What the VA Rep told you is true when going to school under the Post 9/11 GI Bill. If you are in a degree program or in a non-degree program at a school also teaching degree programs, not taking all online courses and have a rate of pursuit of greater-than-half-time, then you get a monthly housing allowance calculated on the zip code of your school and paid at the rate of an E-5 with dependents. The VA pays your tuition and fees up to the in-state maximum and you would get a book stipend calculated at $41.67 per credit (up to $1,000 per year).

I’m not entirely sure what you are trying to extend or appeal. If you want to switch back to your old GI Bill, that is nearly impossible. The VA is very explicit that changing to the Post 9/11 GI bill is a one-way road and that switching is irrevocable.

As far as your one-year extension, are you trying to extend the delimiting date? The Post 9/11 GI Bill has a 15-year delimiting date, so the first New GI Bill won’t expire until 2016. Your old Montgomery GI Bill was good for only 10 years. If you switched to the Post 9/11 GI Bill, you shouldn’t be in a bind for time.

If you previously exhausted your old GI Bill entitlement, you could get an additional 12 months of Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits unless you have already used your 48 months which is the maximum combined months of entitlement a veteran can get. If you had not exhausted your old GI Bill months of benefits when you switched, then you did not get the additional months of entitlement.

Based on your question, I tried to cover all the bases on what I thought you meant. If I missed the mark, please clarify and re-submit your question.

Comments  (16)

This statement is confusing and seems contradictory, anyway you can elaborate?

“If you previously exhausted your old GI Bill entitlement, you could get an additional 12 months of Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits unless you have already used your 48 months which is the maximum combined months of entitlement a veteran can get. If you had not exhausted your old GI Bill months of benefits when you switched, then you did not get the additional months of entitlement.”

posted by Mike
12:00 pm on April 4, 2011

Same problem I have and same answer I got when I was looking for an extension. This is my last month receiving educational benefits and I only have year left. The advisor that I had at the college never even mentioned or gave any advice on changing to Post 9/11. Yes I should have researched it myself, but the reason for an advisor is to help you through your time at their institute. I trusted my V.A. advisor to take care of my educational benefits while I went to school full time, but for some reason she was incapable of doing her job.

posted by Aaron
7:37 pm on April 13, 2011

To get the additional 12 months of Post 9/11 GI Bill entitlement, you have to first use up your 36 months of the Montgomery GI Bill (for example) and then switch to the Post 9/11 GI Bill. If you switch to the Post 9/11 GI Bill with months of MGIB benefit left, then you do not get the additional 12 months – only the same number of months as you had left on your MGIB at the time you switched.

Under the Rule of 48, a servicemember or veteran can only get a maximum of 48 combined number of months of entitlement. If you qualify for only one GI Bill, then you would most likely have 36 months of entitlement. If you qualify for two GI Bills or more, then the most you could get would be 48 total from all your GI Bills. If you have already used up your 48 months from two other GI Bills, then you could not get any additional months of benefits if you switched to the Post 9/11 GI bill, because you would already have used up your maximum amount.

posted by Ron Kness
11:12 am on April 19, 2011

What happens if you exhausted your Post 9/11 Gi bill but you wasnt on a 48month gi bill? I was only given 25k for mgib bill which was about 24months.

posted by tony
6:32 pm on April 29, 2011

As far as I know, you can only get an additional 12 months by exhausting your MGIB and switching to the Post 9/11 GI Bill. The way the Rule of 48 reads is “up to 48 months”, so there is not guarantee you will get the full 48 months. If your MGIB was for 24 months, then you would get those 24 months plus the 12 Post 9/11 GI Bill months.

posted by Ron Kness
10:24 am on May 3, 2011

I have a question and I am not sure if anyone has cover it. I left the military in 08 and I waited to the new GI BILL to kick in to start using it however the VA says you get 36 months from that 9/11 GI BILL which is roughly 4 years worth of school. Now my question is if you used their 36 months they say you have then is there any way to get an extension for a year so you can finish? keeo in mind I only used my post 9/11 GI BILL. If possible to extend it then where can I do it?

posted by Luis
3:15 pm on June 24, 2011

It is only possible to extend for the additional 12 months if you qualify for two or more GI Bills. If you only qualify for one, then you are limited to 36 months.

posted by Ron Kness
6:34 am on July 3, 2011

Hi,I’m graduating this x/mas with a bachelors degree in sociology,..and i want to continue to my masters program on another major,( if that matters),and the post 911 gibill is running out on me by january 2012,can i extend to complete my masters program?

posted by steve
1:30 am on September 7, 2011

Under the VA’s Rule of 48, if you qualify for two or more GI Bills, the maximum number of months of entitlement you can get are 48 months. So if you used up your initial 36 months under the Post 9/11 GI Bill, you could get another 12 months under another GI Bill. However, if the Post 9/11 GI Bill is the only one you have, or if you switched from the Montgomery to the Post 9/11, then you are out of options.

posted by Ron Kness
8:30 am on September 20, 2011

48 months is the maximum, I understand, but if you are in month 48 and have 2 months left in the semester, those are still covered, correct? As in, BAH and tuition is covered until the end of that term?

posted by Tiffany
12:01 pm on February 19, 2012

It is as I understand it, if you are using the Montgomery GI Bill, but not if you are using the Post 9/11 GI Bill. With the New GI Bill, once you are out of benefits, the payments will stop.

posted by Ron Kness
5:55 pm on March 4, 2012

I have exhausted my Montgomery GI Bill (Apr 2012). I have not reached my delimiting date (2018). I have approximately 1 more year of school. How do I apply (Rule of 48) for the additional benefits under the Post 9/11 GI Bill?

posted by Tony
9:50 am on August 1, 2012

Just go to the eBenefits website and submit VA Form 22-1990. In return you will get a new Certificate of Eligibility showing you have 12 months of Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits.

posted by Ron Kness
10:41 am on August 5, 2012

Before the Post 9/11 came into effect I only used about a year or so of my GI Bill and once the 9/11 started I begun taking campus classes. Now I am near the end (2 more claseses) before receiving my degree but now I am strongly considering pursing my Master’s Degree & was wondering will I be able to request and extention in hopes of receiving my Masters?

posted by Tese
10:28 am on September 7, 2012

The GI Bill has a fixed number of months of benefits (36) and its intent is to get you up to a four year degree, so you can learn a career, get a job and make a living. There really isn’t any provision to give you more months of benefits under that same GI Bill to get you your master’s degree.

However, with that said, if you also qualify for the Post 9/11 GI Bill, by serving after September 10, 2001 for at least 90 days on a Title 10 order, you could get an additional 12 months of minimal benefits under the Post 9/11 GI Bill. That would take you through one year of your masters. Three years of service after the September date would get you to the 100% tier.

posted by Ron Kness
10:22 am on September 9, 2012

I am currently using my Post 9/11 GI Bill and have been since it started. I was just wondering if I would be able to get an extension on it. I spoke with a VA rep on Friday and was advised to write a letter stating why I would like the extension and then fax it…I did…now I am waiting on feedback!

posted by Tese
9:17 am on September 10, 2012
Post a New Comment






Displayed next to your comment (required)




Will not be published (required)


captcha