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Can I Revoke Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits That I Transferred to My Wife and Step-Daughter?

Author Ron Kness is no longer in the service.

Q: I am going through a divorce. I have my spouse & step-daughter, along with myself and son all on the Post-9/11 GI Bill. No one has used this benefit since I retired April 2010. I was told by Law I can drop them both off this benefit and ensure my son is able to utilize it. Is this true and if so how do I start the process.

A: It is true. As the sponsor holding the Post 9/11 GI Bill, you have complete control over who gets benefits along with maintaining complete control to revoke those benefits even after you have retired. So yes, you can “take back” the benefits you gave to your spouse and step-daughter. Once that action is complete and you have the benefits back, then you could reallocate the revoked benefits to your son.

As you know, you have 36 months of benefits. If you plan on using some of the benefits yourself, be sure to keep back what you need.

To revoke benefits, you will have to send the VA a letter describing what you want to do and the pertinent information they need, such as names, SSNs and the number of months you are requesting to be withdrawn from each member. Then once that action is complete, send another letter transferring benefits to your son. They will need the same approximate information on him also.

You could request both actions in one letter, but sometimes that confuses the issue. Two separate requests adds clarification to the process unless you are in a bind for time; in that case request both actions in the same request.

There really isn’t any set form or format to request revocation and reallocation of benefits. Just make sure you include the information they need to action your request.

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