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After a Deployment, Does My GI Bill Recharge Itself?

Author Ron Kness is no longer in the service.

Q: I used all but 12 months of my active duty GI Bill. I have since served 26 months on active duty in support of overseas contingency operations. Does this recharge/renew or add time back to my GI Bill benefits?

A:  Because the clause “on active duty in support of overseas contingency operations” usually pertains to a Selected Reservist, we could be mixing apples and oranges. As a Reservist or National Guardsman, to qualify for the Post 9/11 GI Bill, you have to serve at least 91-days on a Title 10 order in support of a contingency operation, after September 10, 2001. If you are normally an active duty servicemember anyway, then whether you are supporting a contingency operation or not is inconsequential, because you are always on a Title 10 order.

Under the Rule of 48, if you qualify for two or more GI bills, the maximum combined number of months of entitlement is limited to 48. If you have used 24 months of your Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) already, then the best you can hope for is the additional 12 months of the Post 9/11 GI Bill. The only way to get those additional months is to first exhaust your MGIB, then switch to the New GI Bill. If you switch with MGIB months left, then you do not get the additional months; only the same number of MGIB months you had before the switch. With 26 months on a Title 10 contingency order, your additional 12 months of benefits would be at the 80% tier as far as a payment percentage.

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