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30 inch Step from the Halt and the Halt

STEP I

1. Instructional Formation, MARCH. AT EASE. The next movement, which I will name, explain, have demonstrated, and which you will conduct practical work on, is the 30 inch step from the halt.

2. This movement is used to march an element from point A to point B in a uniform manner.

3. The commands for these movements are Forward, MARCH and HALT.

4. Forward, MARCH is a two-part command, Forward is the preparatory command, and MARCH is the command of execution. HALT is also a two-part command when preceded by a preparatory command, such as Squad, Platoon, or Demonstrator. I will use Demonstrator as the preparatory command, and HALT as the command of execution.

5. When given, these commands are as follows: Forward, MARCH. Demonstrator, HALT.

STEP II

6. Demonstrator, POST. I will use the step-by-step method of instruction.

7. On the preparatory command Forward of Forward, MARCH, without noticeable movement, shift the weight of the body to the right foot. Forward.

8. On the command of execution MARCH of Forward, MARCH, step forward 30 inches with the left foot, keeping the head and eyes fixed to the front. The arms swing in a natural motion, without exaggeration and without bending at the elbows, approximately nine inches straight to the front and six inches straight to the rear of the trouser seams. Keep the fingers curled as in the position of attention so that the fingers just clear the trousers. MARCH.

9.. On the command of execution STEP of Ready, STEP, execute a 30-inch step forward with the trail foot. Once again, ensure that you keep the head and eyes fixed to the front. Allow the arms to swing in a natural motion, without exaggeration and without bending the elbows, approximately nine inches straight to the front and six inches straight to the rear of the trouser seams. Keep the fingers curled as in the position of attention, so that the fingers just clear the trousers. Ready, STEP.

10. You will continue marching in this manner until otherwise directed. To further illustrate this movement, I will have my demonstrator execute a series of steps. Ready, STEP. Ready, STEP.

11. The command to terminate this movement is HALT. The halt is executed in two counts. The preparatory command Demonstrator of Demonstrator, HALT, may be given as either foot strikes the marching surface. However, the command of execution HALT of Demonstrator, HALT, must be given the next time that same foot strikes the marching surface.

12. On the command of execution STEP of Ready, STEP, execute a 30-inch step forward with the trail foot. When that foot strikes the marching surface, the demonstrator will receive the preparatory command Demonstrator of Demonstrator, HALT. Ready, STEP. Demonstrator.

13. On the command of execution STEP of Ready, STEP, execute a 30-inch step forward with the trail foot. This is the intermediate step required between the preparatory command and the command of execution. Ready, STEP.

14. On the command of execution STEP of Ready, STEP, execute a 30-inch step forward with the trail foot. When the foot strikes the marching surface, the demonstrator will receive the command of execution HALT of Demonstrator, HALT. Ready, STEP. HALT.

15. On the command of execution STEP of Ready, STEP, execute a 30-inch step forward with the trail foot, this being the additional step required after the command of execution. Ready, STEP.

16. On the command of execution STEP of Ready, STEP, bring the trail foot alongside the lead foot, resuming the position of attention, thus terminating this movement. Ready, STEP. RE-FORM.

17. At normal cadence, this movement would look as follows: Forward, MARCH. Demonstrator, HALT. AT EASE.

18. What are your questions pertaining to this movement when executed at normal cadence or using the step-by-step method of instruction?

19. Demonstrator, ATTENTION. You will now become my assistant instructor. FALL OUT.

STEP III

20. FALL IN. Right, FACE. I will use the step-by-step method of instruction.